Pre-prohibition cocktails and modern twists on classics

Americano

Americano

Ingredients:

1oz Sweet Vermouth

1oz Campari

1oz Seltzer

Orange Twist

Instructions:

Add the Campari and Vermouth to a double Old Fashioned glass. Add ice and stir. Top with the seltzer and garnish with the orange twist.

Notes:

Refreshing and light with the orange and bitter from the Campari tempered by the sweetness of the vermouth and carbonation in the soda, the Americano is sure to please fans of Campari.


History:

In the late 1800s, Gaspare Campari, creator of Campari,  served a drink called the Milano-Torino at his Caffe Campari in Milan. The name reflected the origins of its two main ingredients: Campari from Milan and Cinzano vermouth from Torino. During prohibition, Americans flocked to Italy and other European countries. As the story goes, Americans loved the taste of Campari and particularly this cocktail. The name was changed to the Americano in the 1920s as a nod to the Americans who took such a fondness to this bright red cocktail.

While overshadowed by the Vesper and Vodka Martini, the Americano was actually the first drink ordered by James Bond in Flemings first 007 novel, Casino Royale.

Variations:

A popular way to make the Americano is in a highball glass, as pictured above, using more seltzer than the original recipe. Try it both ways and see what you prefer.

The most famous variation of the Americano is another classic, the Negroni, substituting gin for the soda. Sticking closer to the Americano, try adding a little St. Germain or Domaine de Canton to this one.

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