Pre-prohibition cocktails and modern twists on classics

Lily’s Pad

Lily's Pad 2

Ingredients:

2oz Hendrick’s Gin

.5oz Velvet Falernum

.75oz Maraschino

.75oz Dolin Blanc

.75oz St. Germain

.75oz Lemon juice

8 Bittermens Boston bittahs

15 Mint Leaves

4 Cucumber Slices

Instructions:

Drop the mint and cucumber into the bottom of a chilled shaker glass. Top with the velvet falernum. Muddle a bit to bruise the mint and cucumber. Add the gin, maraschino, Dolin Blanc, St. Germain, lemon juice and bittahs. Add ice and shake vigorously. Double strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with a cucumber slice and mint sprig.

Notes:

Spring personified.  A light citrus mint and cucumber nose. This one tastes a bit like a spring inspired hybrid of an Aviation, New Martinez and a “refined” cucumber mojito. It is lighter and airier than a mojito with a more “defined” botanical flavor, and a less sugary taste. The lemon juice blends into the background, resulting in just a touch of sour, which like the Aviation, will appeal to those who are not fans of sours. The Dolin and Maraschino make a for a velvety smooth base on the tongue, similar to the New Martinez. The finish is mildly sweet with a hint of citrus bitter.


Lily's Pad 3

History:

I came up with this one about a year ago while trying to make something with gin, cucumber and mint. I was also drinking a lot of Aviations and New Martinezs at the time and somehow these all got blended together into the recipe you see above.


Lily's Pad


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4 Responses to “Lily’s Pad”

  1. Last Word | The Straight Up

    […] more than simple syrup or other sweetener could ever bring. To me, much like the Aviation and my Lily’s Pad, there is also something special about maraschino in a sour that changes the whole dynamic and […]

    Reply
  2. Gentian Dream | The Straight Up

    […] disheartened, as I had already recently posted a great cocktail that would fit these parameters: Lily’s Pad. This one featured cucumber, mint, elderflower liqueur, velvet falernum, lemon juice and citrus […]

    Reply

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